Boeing to upgrade 737 MAX stall prevention system in 10 days

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The Ethiopian Airlines crash resulted in the deaths of 157 people.

The MCAS is a system of safety sensors and software that Boeing designed for its 737 Max to prevent the aircraft from entering into a stall, flaps-retracted, low-speed, nose-up flight.

Air Canada and United Airlines on Friday became the first major carriers in North America to warn of negative financial implications to business as a outcome of the grounding of the Boeing planes.

"If there were to be anything defective in terms of the plane or any of its components, then it would be possible to bring a claim against the manufacturer as well as the airline", the head of law firm Irwin Mitchell's travel litigation group, Clive Garner, said.

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Airlines bought the 737 MAX for its longer range and fuel efficiency, and some carriers› business plans are facing disruption because of the grounding, which USA lawmakers have said could last for weeks at a minimum. In October, a Lion Air jet crashed in Indonesia killing all 189 people on board. "There is clear similarity between our crash and the Lion Air crash". A link between the two accidents makes blame more likely to lie with Boeing and less likely with the airline. The two Caspian region countries join a growing list of countries that have also grounded the Boeing model, including the United States, the United Kingdom and New Zealand.

Boeing won't comment on the time it has taken engineers to finish the work, but Diehl and industry officials familiar with the situation say it isn't as easy as upgrading an iPhone.

Boeing already faces lawsuits over the Lion Air crash, and lawyers say the second crash strengthens their argument that Boeing knew the plane was defective and let it fly anyway.

The work is being done in coordination with the Ethiopian investigation team. However, it was the same voice throughout, the source said. The Federal Aviation Administration wanted pilots go through instructions on a laptop computer, it said.

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In the meantime an Ethiopian delegation has reportedly joined investigators in France who are probing the cause of last Sunday's Ethiopian Airlines Crash. "His dream was to be a pilot", said Meno Getachew Tessema, 39, Yared's brother. "Break break, request back to home", he told controllers, the newspaper reported. Others carriers say it's too early for them to say whether they will because they can not yet estimate lost revenue and extra costs.

After being cleared by the control room to turn back within three minutes of the flight, Flight 302 climbed to an unusually high altitude and disappeared from the radar over a restricted military zone, the person added.

In Ethiopia, relatives have been visiting the charred and debris-strewn field to pay last respects. The victims came from 35 countries.

Shares of Air Canada fell as much as 3 per cent in early trading in Toronto, but recovered later to close down 0.7 per cent. Shares of United Continental Holdings Inc, the parent of United Airlines, were unchanged at $81.69 in U.S. after-hours trade.

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"We are now stuck in the same place, the same as Monday". "They told us the bodies were small pieces, more than 5,000 pieces, 5,000 to 10,000 pieces". "They didn't expect the Ethiopians to lose their jet while all this was going on", said Alan Diehl, a former investigator for the National Transportation Safety Board.

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